Ahouse4all

Land - Residential - Commercial



CBRE 01226371

Pricing Your Home 


Smart, competitive pricing is essential. When you price too high, your home stays on the market longer, prolonging the process and increasing your expenses along the way.

Home Seller Mistake No. 1: Pricing Too High

“I can always lower the price later if I don't get any offers.”

That statement costs home sellers millions of dollars every year.

Yes, you can always lower your asking price, but that’s not a good strategy. Time and time again, experience shows that sellers who list competitively from the start get a better price than sellers who list high and then go lower and lower.
Why? Psychology.

When you price too high, here's what buyers think:

“Wow, three price cuts in the last four months… There must be something wrong with that house.”

“With all the price cuts on this house, the sellers must be desperate. Let's offer them far below what they’re asking and see if they bite.”

Sound Pricing Strategies

A far smarter approach is to find a knowledgeable agent who understands the local market and then work together on setting the right price. A good agent can help you avoid the overpricing trap.

An experienced agent will help set the right price for your home by considering the following:

Similar homes, via a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA): Your agent will provide a professional analysis that goes deep into stats about recent sales and current listings similar to your home in size, age, condition and features. Sales within the past six months are especially relevant.

General market conditions: Is it a seller's market or a buyer's market in your community? It's important to note that what's happening nationally may not reflect local conditions. Your agent can explain the difference and clear up any misconceptions you may have.

Questions Every Seller Should Ask



Before you sign a listing contract with an agent, interview at least two or three candidates and ask the following questions:


1. Can you tell me about your real estate sales experience?
2. How do you plan to market my property?
3. Do you work part-time or full-time as an agent?
4. What is the right price for this house? And how did you arrive at that figure?
5. How long will it take to sell at this price? What are the average days on market for a house like mine?
6. How will current market conditions affect my home sale?
7. How much should I expect to pay in commission?
8. What kind of communication and/or updates can I expect from you?
9. Can you provide references from three sellers you’ve worked with in the past six months?
10. What happens if my house doesn’t sell in the time we contract for?

How Your Realtor Gets Paid

Like professionals in other sales-based industries, the Realtor pay structure is based largely on commissions derived from successful transactions. Here's how it works:

Seller's agent (or listing agent)
The sellers and their agent agree to a commission percentage, in which the agent’s payment is based on the final sale price. The amount will vary depending on the area and the agent.

Buyer's agent
At the close of the transaction, the seller's agent splits the predetermined commission with the buyer’s agent as compensation for delivering a buyer. This split is usually about half of the total commission.